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The Emperor has no clothes - and ours are cheap and don't breathe

Posted on 08 January 2014

Stehli Silks vintage advertisement 1929

 Stehli Silks vintage advertisement 1929

 

From my years of experience as a vintage clothing dealer, I could be blindfolded and sent to a clothing store and determine,  just by feel, the fabric content of most garments.   I hate to  be the Debbie Downer of fashion but here's the deal..we are now paying more for our clothing and getting less.  I'm not talking about the clothes you buy at fast cheap fashion stores and big box stores where you know you are getting what you pay for...(that's a whole series of blog entries on it's own).   No, I'm talking about department stores and boutiques that sell moderately to highly priced clothing with "designer" labels.  You assume you are getting a better quality when you are paying so much more, right?  I sometimes can't tell a difference between a dress at Target and those at:  FILL IN THE BLANK BOUTIQUES.

 

 

All you have to do is look at these beautiful advertisements for fabric to see what's happened to the fashion industry. Because people used to be more discerning, fabric advertisements used to be some of the most beautiful.  Some were targeted at housewives, and some were targeted to those who could afford to buy designer clothing.  These ads were all so beautiful that you could easily mistake them for fashion ads. The silk and rayon ads from Stehli, Cheney, Enka and Darbrook,  and Ducharne are some of my favorites!

 

Stehlii Silks advertisement from Vogue-1928  Illustrated by Pierre Brissaud

Stehlii Silks advertisement from Vogue-1928  Illustrated by Pierre Brissaud

 

Why don't we see these kinds of ads anymore? Some of the finer fabrics were worthy of ads in fashion magazines like Vogue and Harper's Bazaar, you can now really only find them in sewing magazines.  They used to feature models like Jean Patchett and Lisa Fonssagrives and designers like Ceil Chapman, Tina Leser, Claire McCardell, Adelle Simpson and Herbert Sonheim.  This was easier to do when the designers had a close relationship with their suppliers and didn't use a broker who used a broker who used another broker to buy fabric from a warehouse somewhere in some country somewhere...made by someone somehow from something.  Even if it wasn't an ad for fabric, fashion layouts and designer advertisements often mentioned the fabric company because it meant something in those days.

 

Vintage Schiaparelli 1941 Haramboure illustration of vintage dresses in Ducharne silk fabric

Vintage Schiaparelli 1941 Haramboure illustration of vintage dresses in Ducharne silk fabric

 

Novelty print 1940s dress shown in an advertisement for Enka Fabrics

Novelty print 1940s dress shown in an advertisement for Enka Fabrics

 

A lot of people under the age of 30 have gotten so used to man-made fabrics and low quality clothing,  that they don't even question why anyone would use anything else.  For starters, natural fiber breathes (and yes, it gets wrinkled) - it feels good to the touch and doesn't give you static electricity.  It keeps you cool (you don't need vents cut in cotton or linen) and it keeps you warm - genuine wool and cashmere are ventilated naturally.

 

Ponemah fabric ad featuring Cole of California swimwear

Ponemah fabric ad featuring Cole of California swimwear

 

One of the reasons that buying vintage clothing is appealing to so many people is that the quality of the fabric and finishing of the garment can't be duplicated today and still be affordable.  Some of the mid century  garments I have in my inventory are in better condition than some of the contemporary pieces I've owned for only a month.  Has anyone out there even noticed that fashion quality is slipping away?  Most fabrics are now "blends" (a way to get away with describing things as cashmere or silk), or "easy care" (a synonym for cheaply man made).  Most manufacturers don't finish seams and you rarely find anything that is beautifully lined with silk or rayon.  Soon, only the wealthiest people will be able to afford to buy well made clothing in high quality natural fibers.  Even 100% cotton isn't the same cotton quality anymore.

 

1947 Lonsdale cotton fabric ad featuring designs by prominent mid century female fashion designers Clare Potter, Ceil Chapman, Tina Leser and Adele Simpson, 

1947 Lonsdale cotton fabric ad featuring designs by prominent mid century female fashion designers Clare Potter, Ceil Chapman, Tina Leser and Adele Simpson

 

This famous vintage Lonsdale fashion ad from 1947 featured dresses from some of the most well known American female fashion designers of the day including, Ceil Chapman, Tina Leser, Adele Simpson and Care Potter.  Guess what? They actually used really good cotton for their garments.  The dresses that I have made by those designers are definitely a much higher quality than anything you can find today.

 

Vintage fabric ad featuring a William Rose Enka Rayon couture evening dress Vintage fabric ad featuring a William Rose Enka Rayon couture evening dress

 

When younger women purchase clothing from me, they always comment on how much better the pieces "feel." That's sadly because they aren't used to the "feel" of good fabric.  Older customers remark that they prefer vintage because they haven't been able to find anything made of the quality they are used to wearing in their price range. When I have had fashion interns in the past, the first thing I do is teach them how to feel for quality.

 

1949 vintage advertisement featuring dresses by Madame Gres and Givenchy in ducharne fabric 1949 vintage advertisement featuring dresses by Madame Gres and Givenchy in ducharne fabric

 

Tina Leser hand painted blouse in a vintage ad for Enka rayon. Tina Leser hand painted blouse in a vintage ad for Enka rayon.

 

I am truly spoiled because if I have an event, luncheon, black tie affair or wedding to attend, I can choose from hundreds of vintage dresses.  Without fail, every time I wear something from my inventory, people think I am wearing something current from a famous designer.  Wearing vintage doesn't mean looking dated or kitsch, it can be quite the opposite if you learn what looks best on you and incorporate it into your own wardrobe. If you could find a dress like he Ceil Chapman dress shown below. you would turn heads everywhere and no one would ever guess that it was almost 60 years old!

 

Ceil Chapman gold evening gown in a 1955 Avisco fabric advertisement featuring model Dorian Leigh  Ceil Chapman gold evening gown in a 1955 Avisco fabric advertisement featuring model Dorian Leigh

 

Can you imagine top models posing for fabric ads today?  

 

Rudolf designer dress in an Enka rayon ad from 1954 Rudolf designer dress in an Enka rayon ad from 1954

 

Claire McCardell dress in a Stonecutter fabric ad  Claire McCardell dress in a Stonecutter fabric ad

 

Don't get me wrong, I know that man made fabrics have been around for a long time - if you've seen  1950s tulle wedding gowns you will find that many are made of "Orlon."  But in those days, you paid less for a gown made of nylon but the average American bride to be could still save to buy the silk fabric to have a wedding dress made.  Now, to buy the kind of silk and rayon they used in the past, even if you are making it yourself, would be outrageously expensive.  Women buy my vintage wedding gowns because they want to have something unique, well made, and beautifully cut that doesn't cost them tens of thousands of dollars.  Even if they buy a more expensive vintage wedding gown, they can still pay to have it altered to fit them perfectly and spend less than they would have on a new one made from silk or rayon satin.

 

Soie Naturelle (silk) fabric ad 1930's wedding dress Soie Naturelle (silk) fabric ad 1930's wedding dress

 

Part of the problem with committing to buying only higher quality, ethically made clothing is that, even if we know who made the piece, most of us have no idea of who made the fabric!.  I am really afraid that most of us don't want to know.  People will get very angry about those who wear fur and sometimes leather because of animal rights but they are less likely to question where their favorite designer got the fabric they used to make that perfect party dress or favorite pair of jeans. 

 

Monique D'estrill vintage wedding dress in Helanca nylon  Monique D'estrill vintage wedding dress in Helanca nylon

 

 Some would argue that taking care of genuine silk, linen and rayon is too time consuming for the average American woman today.  My response would be ... if you bought several good pieces a couple of times a  year and took very good care of them, you would be saving money and time.  Even if you have them cleaned by a dry cleaner (who knows what they are doing), you will not only save money, but you will be doing less harm to our planet.  By refusing to support fast disposable fashion and rejecting the tendency to be on to the next trend train, you will be defining your own unique style with quality and integrity.

 

Vintage art deco 1920s Darbrook Silks fashion ad Vintage art deco 1920s Darbrook Silks fashion ad

 

Labels don't mean anything to me unless the clothing itself can prove to be worthy of that label.  I'm not impressed by runway shows unless I can touch the fabric and feel the quality first hand.  They all make great pins on Pinterest but are they worth what they claim to be?  When I see the price tag of a nylon or polyester dress at _________ I want to scream;  "The Emperor has no clothes!"  Translation: :"Doesn't anybody see what a piece of _____ this is?"  But I usually cant find anyone who will listen..  Is it just my imagination?

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